The Spoked Traveller | Cod by another name
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Cod by another name

Cod by another name

Born in Newfoundland, with a Newfie ma, then moving to Nova Scotia, I ate my share of cod fish as a child. Salted cod, cod tongues…. If you’re Portuguese, who historically sailed over to our Grand Banks to fish, then the same applies. Since arriving here, I’ve heard more than one person say: “did you know we have 1001 ways to serve cod?” In Mark Kurlansky’s book, Cod: A Biography of The Fish That Changed the World, he talks about this incorrigible fish that was prized for its nutrition, made of 80% protein, and fortitude: it hung on until it was fished to almost death. The Newfoundland moratorium over 20 years ago was done, hoping, it would bring the fish back.

Today, in Porto, I crossed the Duoro River, first walking over the Dom Luis bridge, then descending on a quick gondola ride, to the suburb of Gaia where port warehouses, many of Portugal’s most famous, Calum’s, Taylor’s, line the river.

This is a view of Porto from the Gaia side.

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First, I had a taste of a white port at Quinta do Noval, in business since 1715! Say what?

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It tasted less sweet than traditional red port.

So, cod 1001 ways. Cod cheesecake, and cod smoothies?

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This was shredded cod and potatoes at Bacalhoeiro Restaurante. Portuguese call cod BACALHAU.

www.bacalhoeiro.com.pt

Their business card, and logo, is a piece of cod, splayed, drying on a line. I have the exact one in ceramic; it’s a Christmas tree decoration from mommy. Who else has a cod fish tree ornament? I love the Portuguese/Newfoundland connection. Fishy friends.

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